Why You Should Choose Camp Bow Wow

Camp Bow Wow has one of the most all-inclusive boarding facilities around! Other places may try to lure you in with their “low rate”, but by the time you check out and they’ve added on all the extra fees, you’ll soon find out they’re not as cheap as you’d thought. At Camp Bow Wow, all of our pricing is inclusive and there are no hidden fees and no surprises!

We believe in “Happy healthy pets, happy healthy people” and adding extra charges would frustrate you, which definitely won’t make you happy or healthy.

What’s included in Camp Bow Wow Boarding rates?

  • 6 to 8 hours of supervised indoor/outdoor open play in one of our play yards (grouped by size and temperament)
  • Spacious private cabin accommodations for eating and sleeping
  • Clean and comfy Kuranda cots
  • Cozy bedding (we have plenty but you are welcome to bring from home as well)
  • House food (we recommend you bring your own, less likely to upset dog’s stomach)
  • 24/7 monitoring
  • Webcam access in all play yards
  • Best butt scratches in town
  • Lots of affection
  • Camp fire treat at bedtime

What else is included in your boarding stay?

  • Feeding
  • Medication administration (no injectables)
  • Two full days of daycare with each night’s boarding stay. We only charge you for the night of your boarding stay, not the check-out day. (That is right, you get check out day for FREE.) Check-in within normal business hours to take advantage of your day care day and then pick up the next night at closing for NO extra charge!
  • Accommodations for special needs and senior dogs
  • Discounts for multiple pets in the same family
  • Extended stay discounts

We provide quality care

  • Camper run cards: A photo ID of your pet with emergency contact information, vet contact information, behavioral concerns and feeding instructions
  • Medication Cards: Bright yellow cards for medication administration, which is all recorded and double checked
  • Mess hall reports: We keep track of your Camper’s eating habits and mark if they ate “none”, “some”, “most” or “all” of their meal
  • D-Tails cards: Special notes for exciting milestones or to communicate important “D-Tails” about your dogs visit

Click here or call us at 417-882-9247 too check our boarding prices and to book your stay for Memorial Day!

Heartworm Disease In Dogs

heartworm_disease-1What is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworm disease or dirofilariasis is a serious and potentially fatal disease. It is caused by a blood-borne parasite known as Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted when an infected mosquito bites the dog.

How Do I Know If My Dog Has Heartworm?

Most heartworm positive dogs can show no signs of infection for several years, but if left undiagnosed, the most obvious clinical signs are a soft, dry cough, shortness of breath, weakness, nervousness, listlessness and loss of stamina. All of these signs are most noticeable following exercise, when some dogs may even faint or become disoriented. Your veterinarian may notice abnormal lung and heart sounds when listening to the chest with a stethoscope. In advanced cases, congestive heart failure may be apparent and the abdomen and legs will swell from fluid accumulation. There may also be evidence of weight loss, poor condition and anemia. Severely infected dogs may die suddenly during exercise or excitement

How can I prevent my dog from getting Heartworms?

You can prevent your dog from getting heartworms by using a heartworm preventive. Preventatives will treat the microfilaria transferred by an infected mosquito for a little over a month, and it is recommended that pets receive monthly prevention all year round. The preventatives come in oral, topical and injectable forms and often include intestinal parasite and flea control as well. Safe and affordable heartworm preventives can be given to pets ages 8 weeks and up so that no pet should ever have to endure this dreaded disease.

Thanks to Dr. Jason Banaszak of VCA Saint Clair Shores for this guest post on Heartworm!

Meet Our New Camp Ranger: Tony Caruso

Tony CarusoBy now you’ve likely heard the bark about our new Camp Ranger and we’re here to confirm that the rumors are true! Tony and Jamie Caruso are now the proud owners of Camp Bow Wow Springfield.

Springfield is the second Camp Bow Wow location that this “dog-namic duo” owns. In April of 2007, Tony combined his entrepreneurial spirit and passion for animals and opened his first Camp Bow Wow in Saint Clair Shores, Michigan.

Tony’s Family

Behind every great man is a great woman, or in Tony’s case, four of them. Abby Caruso (an eight year old Hungarian Vizsla) was the inspiration that ignited Tony’s passion for animals and drove him to open a Camp. Although she’s clearly the head of the pack, Abby shares Tony with his wife Jamie, daughter Ella, and the newest member of the family, Bella.

His Fur Family

Bella is a five-year old Mastiff that the Caruso’s adopted in 2012. Exhibiting typical “rescue dog” behavior, Bella wasn’t socialized, had a huge distrust of humans and was protective of food. With Tony’s patience and training, Bella is now a happy, healthy girl who loves giving and receiving affection. No one has the heart to break it to Bella that she’s not a lap-dog (her size doesn’t stop her from trying to fit into small spaces, including Ella’s car-seat!).

The family also has a four-year old Abyssinian cat named Louie. Louie thinks he’s a dog and demands full attention at all times. When he’s not purring for affection, he’s causing chaos with the dogs and with Ella, who calls him “meow”.

Tony’s Passions

Tony is not just a “Camp Ranger”, he’s also a Certified Behavior Buddies Trainer. He has worked with numerous rescue groups assisting in temperament testing and training dogs to increase their adoptability. When he’s not at Camp, you can usually find him at a Tiger’s Game in Detroit, Royals game in Kansas City, or golfing.

Top 5 Ways To Avoid Bloat

dog at food bowlIt may seem like a silly word, but Bloat is in line right behind cancer as the leading cause of death in dogs. As the #2 killer of dogs, it’s something you may not know about, but certainly should.

What is bloat?

Bloat is caused by gastric dilation and torsion, or in layman’s terms, the stomach fills with gas and then twists, cutting off blood supply to vital organs.

Who can get bloat?

Any dog with a stomach can suffer from bloat and in every case, it can be fatal. Bloat is most common in larger breed dogs that are deep chested such as Great Danes, Dobermans and Labradors. Statistically dogs between the ages of 7 and 12 are at a higher risk for bloat.

How to avoid bloat?

There are many factors that contribute to bloat and veterinary science is always looking into causes and prevention for this awful canine killer. In the interest of keeping it simple, here are the top 5 ways to avoid bloat.

  • Slow down-If you have a gulper instead of a chewer, your dog is at a higher risk for bloat. Try a Brakefast bowl or feed smaller portions at a time to slow down your dogs eating.
  • Limit exercise after meals-Dogs need about an hour and a half to 2 hours of rest to completely digest their food. So if your active pup wants to eat and run…limit their mobility until they digest.
  • Check the ingredients-Statistically dog foods with fat within the first 4 ingredients have a higher potential to cause bloat. Fat is not digestible so it sits in your dogs stomach, then you add water, which makes it expand…and still not digest.
  • Consider multiple meals-If your dog only eats once a day chances are they are more ravenous to eat when the bowl drops. Giving them access to food more than once a day may slow down the eating and reduce the risk of bloat because the stomach isn’t going from empty to full in such a rapid time frame.

How we try to prevent bloat

At Camp, bloat is obviously a huge concern for us, as safety is our #1 priority. We do a variety of things to track the health and safety of your Camper during their time with us including (but not limited to):

  • Mess Hall Reports-we track each of your Campers meals and mark if they ate “some” “none” “most” or “all” of their meals.
  • Requiring a 2 hour rest period after meals-Although it’s more common in larger breed dogs, since bloat has the risk of fatality, even our teacup Campers get a 2 hour break after meals, no exceptions.
  • B.Y.O.F.-We always recommend you bring your own food. Changing a dogs diet “cold turkey” can upset their stomach, cause diarrhea and put them at a higher risk for bloat.
  • Watch for warning signs-We love your Campers as if they were our own, because we feel like they are! We know your Camper and their “normal” habits and behaviors. If we feel your Camper is out of sorts, we’re going to let you know. We watch for behavioral and health alerts all day long. If your dog is showing signs of pain or discomfort, vomiting diarrhea or symptoms or any concern we’re going to let you know. If we suspect your dog may be suffering from bloat, we will immediately take them to the closest vet and call you on the way. Timing is everything and bloat can cause death within an hour.

If your dog has eaten 30 minutes or less before dropping them off at Camp, please let us know so we can give them the appropriate amount of time to digest before letting them play. The exercise they experience at Camp is more rigorous than at home, so we take every precaution.

Dog Bite Prevention Awareness

dog and kidRegardless of how long you’ve had your family dog or how much he puts up with from the kids it’s imperative that you always use caution where kids and dogs are involved.

If you don’t have a dog of your own but your kids are going to be spending time at someone’s house who does it’s important they understand the appropriate way to approach and act around a dog, especially one that isn’t theirs.

Remind your kids of these basic principles and keep everyone safe and happy!

Respect a dogs space

  • Always approach a dog slowly and calmly: Running toward a dog or approaching a dog with excited behavior can cause many problems.
  • Don’t put your face in a dogs face: Even though you may be the same size, trying to see “eye to eye” with a dog is a threatening behavior and can make a dog fearful, which can cause him to bite
  • Never approach a dog when he’s eating: You wouldn’t like it if someone was hovering over you while you ate, or tried to take your dinner away, so don’t do it to your dog!

Pet dogs gently and in the right place

  • Always pet dogs gently and under the chin or chest-Never reach over a dogs back or head, this can be mistaken for a negative touch and the dog could react accordingly.
  • Always let the dog see you before you touch him-Extend your hand to the dog before you pet him, letting him know you’re coming. No one likes when someone sneaks up on him!

Never approach a strange dog

  • ALWAYS ask permission to approach or pet someone’s dog-Even a friendly dog can be afraid when approached by a stranger. Not all dogs are friendly so you should always ask before you pet a dog.

These are just a few simple steps to keep your kids safe and give them guidelines for dog safety.

Why You Should Board Your Pooch With Us

What's including in Camp Bow Wow dog boardingCamp Bow Wow has one of the most all-inclusive boarding facilities around! Other places may try to lure you in with their “low rate”, but by the time you check out and they’ve added on all the extra fees, you’ll soon find out they’re not as cheap as you’d thought. At Camp Bow Wow, all of our pricing is inclusive and there are no hidden fees and no surprises!

We believe in “Happy healthy pets, happy healthy people” and adding extra charges could infuriate you, which definitely won’t make you happy or healthy.

What’s included in Camp Bow Wow Boarding rates?

  • 6 to 8 hours of supervised indoor/outdoor open play in one of our play yards (grouped by size and temperament)
  • Spacious private cabin accommodations for eating and sleeping
  • Kuranda cots
  • Cozy bedding (we have plenty but you are welcome to bring yours from home as well)
  • House food (however, we do recommend you bring your own as it’s less likely to upset your dog’s stomach)
  • 24/7 monitoring
  • Webcam access in all play yards
  • Best butt scratches in town
  • Lots of affection
  • Camp fire treat at bedtime

What else is included in your boarding stay?

  • Feeding
  • Medication administration (no injectables allowed)
  • Two full days of daycare with each night’s boarding stay. We only charge you for the night of your boarding stay, not the check-out day. (That is right, you get check out day for FREE.) Check-in within normal business hours to take advantage of your day care day and then pick up the next night at closing for NO extra charge!
  • Accommodations for special needs and senior dogs
  • Discounts for multiple pets in the same family
  • Extended stay discounts

We provide quality care

  • Camper run cards – A photo ID of your pet with emergency contact information, vet contact information, behavioral concerns and feeding instructions
  • Medication Cards – Bright yellow cards for medication administration, which is all recorded and double checked
  • Mess hall reports – We keep track of your Camper’s eating habits and mark if they ate “none”, “some”, “most” or “all” of their meal
  • D-Tails cards – Special notes for exciting milestones or to communicate important “D-Tails” about your dogs visit

Click here to see our boarding prices.

Canine Cough: Fact V. Fiction

sick-pugHappy Healthy Pets

“Happy Healthy pets” is one of the foundations that the Camp Bow Wow concept is founded on. For many pets the bulk of their “health” stems from a balanced life and current vaccinations.

Vaccinations

Vaccinations are an important part of anyone’s health; including our own. We all remember waiting in the lobby at the Doctors office for the dreaded “measles, mumps and rubella” shot. School aged children are vaccinated prior to the start of school and still we’ve all shuddered in fear when the bright colored note comes home in our childs backpack about pink eye, or even worse; LICE!

Canine Cough: Fact v. Fiction

While the “big” viruses such as Distemper and Rabies are cases we never really hear about, Canine Cough is (unfortunately) quite common. Let’s take a closer look at the Bordetella vaccine and Canine Cough and decipher fact from fiction.

Fact: What is Canine Cough?

The medical terminology is “Infectious Tracheobronchitis” which is a highly contagious upper respiratory infection. This airborne canine virus is like a sinus infection for humans and is often seasonal. Humidity (excessive moisture in the air) seems to breed the virus and allow it to spread faster so it’s not unusual to see an outbreak of Canine Cough in the summer.

Fiction: Dogs Only Get Canine Cough at Kennels

FALSE! While it’s often referred to as “Kennel Cough” this airborne virus can actually spread anywhere there are multiple canines in close proximity; the dog park, on a dog walk, even at the vet. It is more common in kennels because of the number of dogs in close proximity.

Fact: Dogs can be vaccinated against Canine Cough

The preventative measure for the Canine Cough is a vaccine known as Bordetella. All Campers are required to have this vaccine; however it only vaccinates against a particular strain of the virus.

Fiction: If a Dog has the vaccine he can’t get Canine Cough

With over 100 different strains of the virus it would impossible to vaccinate against every possible strain. The Bordetella vaccine is a preventative measure to keep all of our Campers safe but it doesn’t guarantee your dog will never come in contact with this airborne virus.

Fact: There are symptoms of Canine Cough

The main symptom of Canine Cough is, obviously, the cough. The dry, hacking cough mimics the sound of a cat hacking up a hairball and can be exasterbated by excessive activity.

Fiction: The symptoms of Canine Cough are always obvious and the virus is easily detectable

Although there are symptoms of the virus it has an incubation period that can last 3 to 14 days. A dog can carry the virus around without it producing any symptoms for quite some time The treatment for Canine Cough mainly centers around the virus running its course; however some veterinarians may provide antibiotics to prevent against other illnesses while the immune system is weakened.

Preventative Measures for Canine Cough

  • Every Camper is required to be current with the Bordetella vaccine
  • Our cleaning processes are rigorous
  • We ask that you let us know if your dog has contracted a case of Canine Cough so we can take extra precautions to prevent the spread of the illness.
  • If your dog is showing any symptoms of illness please don’t bring them to Camp until they recover or are treated by your veterinarian.

If you have questions about this virus or regarding the other vaccinations we require at Camp, don’t hesitate to ask!