Meet Camp Director, Chelsey!

Chelsey joined us in January of 2016 and we are very happy to have her leading our team!

CBW Chelsey Miller 2Before coming on board with Camp Bow Wow, Chelsey was the Program Director at the Humane Society of Southwest Missouri for nearly five years.  She received her Canine Behavior Assessor Certification through the Humane Society’s partnership with PetSmart Charities Rescue Waggin’ Program.  This has served her well in both her rescue work as well as in the open play environment at Camp Bow Wow.

Chelsey is thankful for the opportunity at Camp Bow Wow to see, on a daily basis, the positive impact she can have on a dog’s life.  Being able to meet the mental and physical stimulation needs of dogs with Camp gives Chelsey great joy. She knows that helping the Campers be the best dog they can be will keep them in their FUR-ever home.

Chelsey shares her life with two pups! Her first fur-child is a Jack Russell Terrier Chihuahua mix named Ellie Bug. Ellie is a seven-year old rescue from the Humane Society of Southwest Missouri. She describes Ellie as a “big personality in a little package,” which is how we’d describe Chelsey!

Finn Diesel, a Border Collie/Australian Shepherd mix, joined Chelsey’s family in February of 2017! He stole Chelsey’s heart from a rescue in Pittsburg, Kansas and she will be the first to tell you it was love at first sight. Finn loves to play in the water, go hiking, and playing with his big sister, Ellie!

When Chelsey isn’t at work, you can usually find her at her yoga studio, enjoying herself outside or curled up with a book.  She also still enjoys helping our friends at the Humane Society of Southwest Missouri through Camp Bow Wow’s Foster Dogs At Camp program and various fundraising events.

Meet Camp Manager, Chelsea!


CBW Chelsea Waters 2Chelsea began working at Camp in March of 2012 and has earned herself the title of Camp Manager.

Chelsea loved the idea of working part-time at a doggy day care while she was in school, and now she now can’t imagine her life without all of the happy Campers five days a week!

Chelsea has completed Scout’s Academy Paw 1, 2, and 3 certifications. She is also in the process of becoming a certified dog trainer and voluntarily dresses up as our Camp mascot, Scout!

Chelsea’s favorite part of Camp is maintaining a happy work environment for the clients, Campers, and employees! She genuinely enjoys socializing with the clients and getting to know them. To her, providing a safe place for parents to leave their dogs is the greatest reward of her job.

At home, Chelsea has a six-year old black Labrador Retriever mix named Zeus. Zeus enjoys dressing up in cool t-shirts, getting pup cones from Andy’s, and snuggling with Chelsea every chance he gets. It’s safe to say he has his mom wrapped around his paw!

Since she grew up at the Lake of the Ozarks, Chelsea is an outdoor girl at heart. When she’s not at Camp you can usually find her taking Zeus on nature walks, going to concerts, attending sporting events (especially St. Louis Cardinal games), and updating the line-ups on her fantasy sports teams!

Winter Dangers For Dogs

puddle of antifreezeIn the fall, ignorance is bliss…but the cold harsh reality is that soon “cold” and “harsh” will be our reality, our winter reality.

While we’re busy checking our furnaces and trying on our boots it’s important to remember that even our furry four legged family members need winter care.

Aside from the bitter cold there are other winter dangers to consider if you have a pet:

  • Antifreeze-Antifreeze is deadly to animals so be mindful of where you’re walking and watch for puddles. Antifreeze is often spilled and puddles on the ground, which draws dogs to lick it.
  • Rock salt-a necessary evil for Michigan winters, rock salt helps us battle the ice, but the coarse crystals can cause cuts in the pads of your dogs feet or nestle in between their pads with those dangerous contents. While pet safe salt is available (it comes in small round balls as opposed to crystals) not everyone uses it. So in public areas and on walks be mindful of what your dog is walking on.
  • Wet Coat-When your dogs coat gets wet it affects the ability of the coat to keep your dog warm. Make sure you dry your dog off after they come in from out of the snow, this also helps keep your house dry…as they won’t be thawing all over your furniture!
  • Seasonal Plants-those gorgeous Poinsettias you put out for the holidays are toxic to pets, so make sure they are out of reach…out of sight, out of mind! The branches of real and artificial trees are tempting to dogs so keep an eye on how your pooch is helping you decorate for the holidays!
  • Holiday treats-Face it, the holidays are a time to fall off the diet wagon and indulge in decadent desserts. Most of those tasty ingredients are toxic to dogs. Watch your baking stash, especially where chocolate is involved and be sure no one is sneaking human treats to your dog.

If you’re looking for your dog to get some exercise during the winter months but would rather stay indoors than face the freeze, bring them in for a day at Camp! They can run around with their friends and will come home nice and tired!

Winter Dangers for Dogs

CBW Dog Blog

puddle of antifreezeIn the fall, ignorance is bliss…but the cold harsh reality is that soon “cold” and “harsh” will be our reality, our winter reality.

While we’re busy checking our furnaces and trying on our boots it’s important to remember that even our furry four legged family members need winter care.

Aside from the bitter cold there are other winter dangers to consider if you have a pet:

  • Antifreeze-Antifreeze is deadly to animals so be mindful of where you’re walking and watch for puddles. Antifreeze is often spilled and puddles on the ground, which draws dogs to lick it.
  • Rock salt-a necessary evil for Michigan winters, rock salt helps us battle the ice, but the coarse crystals can cause cuts in the pads of your dogs feet or nestle in between their pads with those dangerous contents. While pet safe salt is available (it comes in small round balls as…

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Top Five Ways To Feed Your Dog

puzzle feederIn the cold winter months it’s harder to give our dogs the physical exercise they need to remain happy and balanced. We are less inclined to go for long walks or play ball at the dog park when there’s snow and ice on the ground. There is an easy (and warm) way to keep your dog mentally and physically stimulated and it’s something already built into your schedule, feeding!

Did you know that 10 minutes of mental stimulation is like 30 minutes of physical exercise for your dog? What better way to tire them out mentally than by using their own meals? Here’s our top 5 ways to get creative at meal time!

  • Use a Squirrel Dude or Kong toy: There’s a method to the madness for stuffing a squirrel…put something stinky in the top (to fill the head) it can be your dog’s favorite treat, a piece of cheese, hot dog, etc. Then you can fill the middle with their kibble and seal the bottom with something lickable like peanut butter or canned pumpkin,and if you plan ahead enough you can even freeze it overnight! Freezing it makes it last longer and is also a bit less messy!
  • Use A Puzzle Feeder: Puzzle feeders are great mental stimulation toys, they also help slow down fast eaters. Place a few pieces of food in each compartment and watch your dog sniff to solve the puzzle. The moving parts require focus and mental stimulation and they’ll have to figure out how to manipulate the toy to get the food out. With only a little bit of food in each compartment your dog won’t be able to suck down their entire meal in one gulp, which prevents bloat and regurgitation.
  • Use A Muffin Tin & Tennis Balls: A simple muffin tin is an inexpensive way to feed your dog. If your dog still gulps down the food, make it more challenging by placing a tennis ball on top and making them move the balls to find the food in the tin cups. You can also use the muffin tin and tennis balls for “find it” games with treats.
  • Play “Find It”: Place a small mouthful of food under a small cup and scatter them around. If you have multiple cups you can put food under some of them, but not all to make it more challenging for your dog. They’ll have to sniff out the food (“find it”) and flip the cup over in order to get the food. You can even teach your dog to “ask permission” to eat by sitting and looking at you before gulping it down. Dogs who are “nosy” always sniffing, curious, etc. love this game! And you can make it as simple or advanced as you want.
  • Work for it! Good ole’ obedience commands do the trick every time. If you enjoy interacting with your dog and keeping them engaged practice your basic obedience commands and use their kibble as reward. Nothing like a lil’ bit of good ole’ fashioned work to make your dog appreciate that mouthful of food!